Dating site glass

“Within ten minutes of the date she mentioned her going rate, and my brother realized that he was on a date with a prostitute.” That echoes a personal essay the Australian writer Al Kalyck wrote last March: “This one time I met up with a prostitute on Tinder,” he begins.

He and his date, “Victoria,” hung out around her house for a while before she had to go to work.

Searching for love shouldn't just be about the number of people you meet.

Like most things in life, it's quality, not quantity that's important.

and I just tested positive for HIV.” Stories like this one, of course, highlight the need for more than just vigilant moderation on the part of social networks and dating sites; if the Internet has become “a virtual street for people in the sex industry,” then sex workers operating online arguably need the same protections that people on the street do: safe-sex education and health care, chief among them.

But in lieu of that kind of outreach, dating sites have little recourse besides the delete button.

Keywords like “pay to play,” “escort” and “sugar daddy” turn up hundreds of users on Ok Cupid and its less-cool corollary, Plenty of Fish.

(One indicative profile: “NO sniching [sic] and reporting s*** over here … $$$$$$$$$.”) In 2012, the now-defunct blog Annals of Online Dating compiled half a dozen solicitations from users of online-dating sites.

But how can you know if they're truly compatible with you?

“I begged her to let me come in and sit in the corner and watch the process,” Kalyck wrote, “but she told me I’d have to pay.” In a statement to The Post, Tinder said it actively polices both spam and illegal activity on the app — and that a major technical update the company rolled out last week should help cut spam down.

But the service declined to say how many real users it had deleted on suspicion of prostitution.

The Symantec report, which came out Tuesday, documented a number of scams that many Tinder users have probably swiped-left by before: enticements to chat on sketchy platforms with names like “Slut Roulette,” provocative photos promising dirty acronyms for cash, short-URL advertisements for webcam sites and services that cost absurd amounts of money.

In most cases, Symantec reports, the hoax is a simple one: When users click through to say, blamcams.com, and then sign up for an overpriced membership, blamcams pays the spammer a kind of head-hunting fee. “My brother who works in Manhattan was matched with a fellow New Yorker and chatted with her for a few days when she asked to meet up with him,” Katherine Wolfgang wrote about Tinder in Elon University’s student newspaper last year.

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