Teen advice about dating

Compare methods, learn about side effects, and figure out which one is right for you! But having honest conversations with your partner, parents, or health care provider is an important step—whether you're doing it, not doing it, saying no to it, or figuring out if you’re ready for it.

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Trust that your child knows their situation better than you do and will leave when they’re ready. Help your child identify the unhealthy behaviors and patterns in their relationship. With your teen, identify relationships around you (within your family, friend group or community) that are healthy and discuss what makes those relationships good for both partners.

When you’re talking to your teen about a plan of action, know that the decision has to come from . If they’re uncomfortable discussing this with you, help them find additional support.

Many teens fear that their parents may overreact, blame them or be disappointed.

Others worry that parents won’t believe them or understand.

For example, instead of saying, “She is controlling” you could say, “I don’t like that she texts you to see where you are.” Remember that there still may be love in the relationship — respect your child’s feelings.“We were friends for a year and so it kind of just turned into [a romantic relationship],” Kailyn continued.“So, it’s not like she was trying to wine and dine me to ask me to be her girlfriend, you know what I mean?If you force the decision, they may be tempted to return to their abusive partner because of unresolved feelings.Also, leaving is the most dangerous time for victims.

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